Search found 122 matches

by Dragonmaster Zoc
Wed Jun 16, 2010 4:21 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: Immersion
Replies: 16
Views: 7111

To me, there are two levels of Immersion (or three, if you count non-immersion as a level).

Non-immersion is playing it as a board game. Build a character with the biggest bonuses that apply in the most situations so you can win the game by killing all of the bad guys.

Immersion is when you approach gameplay from the character's standpoint. Every decision you make is based on what that character would do in that situation, as though the character was a real person. If the character would make a bad decision or turn against the party, then that's regrettable, but to make a decision based on information the character doesn't have is to destroy the suspension of disbelief. That's the basic level of what I think a roleplaying game should be.

Deep immersion is when you get feedback, and the character starts affecting the player. You become smarter while playing a genius character because you are able to approach things from a more methodical point of view, or you can't eat the pepperoni pizza because your elf is a vegetarian and the thought of eating meat disgusts him. That's going a bit too far, to me.
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Mon May 31, 2010 12:43 am
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: Untitled d20 Project
Replies: 2
Views: 2593

The whole system could be summarized as a collection of house rules for 3.5, and it actually started out that way before I realized that it was such an overhaul that I basically needed to start from scratch in order to keep things straight.

Ideally, you would play it because you enjoy how 3.5 plays but wish to get rid of:
  • Classes
  • Levels
  • Redundant spells and abilities
  • Obscene wealth and mandatory magical items
  • Disparate mechanics (such as Armor Class vs. saves)
It is mainly just a way of removing classes and levels from D&D, which prompted the rest of the changes since classes and levels are such a core concept.

Some criticisms I'm looking for:
  • The difference between races is too small or too great
  • Limited spell selection makes spellcasters feel powerless
  • Target Numbers are too arbitrary and/or require too much GM interpretation
  • Most skills are useless since points are too valuable to spend on anything not combat-oriented
  • Some attributes are vastly more powerful than others
  • Diminishing returns make advancement too slow
  • Diminishing returns means most character will end up too similar
I'm basically looking for any reason why you might look at the rules and decide that you don't want to play it, other than that it's too similar to D&D and you might as well just play that since everyone already knows how.
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Sat May 29, 2010 3:01 am
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: Untitled d20 Project
Replies: 2
Views: 2593

Untitled d20 Project

Hello, everyone.

I've been working on a system for about eight months, and I've reached the point where I need feedback. It's a d20-based system, and I'm aiming it toward people who enjoy Pathfinder (basically, people who enjoyed 3.5 but realized that the mechanics needed an update).

I'm trying to get as much feedback as possible, although I haven't found any takers yet. It's only 80 or so pages so far, but that's enough to prevent me from uploading it here. I posted it to the files section of both the San Diego D&D Meetup and the North County Meetup

If anyone can spare some time to look it over, I'd appreciate any opinions.
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Wed Apr 07, 2010 2:59 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: Design Help: Damage Systems
Replies: 29
Views: 10002

If I'm understanding that correctly, Electron normally uses three dice (his fighting skill) whenever he wants to hurt someone; if he's doing something electricity-related, he has the option of adding up to six more dice (his Power), but those dice would be drained until he can earn them back by making a recovery roll (and he could only potentially earn back 4 dice per round or per scene).

If he was specifically throwing lightning bolts at people, then he could use his three dice (fighting skill) and another three dice from his Power pool, but his Power pool would never decrease at all because he has the lightning bolt super ability at level 3. Conservatively, he could sit back and do this all day, but that would be boring. I would suggest some mechanic to discourage over-use of your most powerful ability.

Maybe when he gets hit, the damage would be done specifically to the ability he was using at the time. Say, Bad-guy kicks him in the face (succeeds in a combat roll) against him while he's trying to shoot lightning, so his lightning bolt loses power and he'll be more inclined to switch to a different power.
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Sat Apr 03, 2010 7:20 am
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: Design Help: Damage Systems
Replies: 29
Views: 10002

[quote="Count Zero"]It does a get a big tricky there. The heat vision is the tough one, but I could totally see the player saying, "Doomsday kicks Superman in the stomach, knocking the wind out of him. That disables his freezing breath since he can't catch a breath." [/quote] Mechanically, I like t...
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Fri Apr 02, 2010 5:28 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: Design Help: Damage Systems
Replies: 29
Views: 10002

I'm not terribly familiar with the other games you're mentioning, but if I'm understanding it correctly then damage done to your dice pools would make you less capable of fighting back; as you start to lose a fight, your powers become weaker, causing you to take more damage to your dice pools, until you're helpless.

I like the idea of characters getting progressively stronger as they start to lose a fight. Maybe you could have a normal type of damage/health value, and whenever you get hit it fills in one of those boxes and you gain that as a bonus to your other dice pools.

I can also imagine narrating the fight, and someone's bound to say "Doomsday punches Superman right in the laser vision" or "Doomsday kicks the freezing breath right out of Superman"; is that something you want people to say while playing?
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Sun Mar 21, 2010 11:19 am
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: Pc<npc
Replies: 15
Views: 5754

Sure, but it makes a lot more sense. Wanting to play a character after you've only had a short time playing it appeals to the sense of new; I'm sure we've all known players who were all too happy to roll up a new character at any opportunity. Short-term characters also have the possibility of being played less seriously, since you don't have to deal with the long-term consequences, and everyone likes to just cut loose and go with the flow once in a while.

I thought people were wanting to play a new character after seeing a different player (or possibly the GM) play that characters. That's what was confusing me, since the way I play a character won't be the same as the way someone else plays that same character; wanting to play the character for such a reason would be ultimately futile.
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Sat Mar 20, 2010 11:06 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: Pc<npc
Replies: 15
Views: 5754

[quote="Uber_snotling"]Example: Party splits up with group members A and B going to a bar while group member C goes to visit his Wizard master. During the bar scene, group member c is getting fidgety, so the GM scribbles some stats for Ronan the Barbarian on a scrap of paper, gives basic personalit...
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Fri Mar 19, 2010 11:13 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: Pc<npc
Replies: 15
Views: 5754

Can anyone give an example?

I'm having trouble visualizing this.
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Fri Mar 19, 2010 9:34 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: Pc<npc
Replies: 15
Views: 5754

I don't quite understand the question, because if I was playing the character instead of the Game Master, then it would be a fundamentally different character.
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Mon Mar 15, 2010 1:23 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: Leverage RPG...
Replies: 11
Views: 5263

Sitting down and planning is often the less interesting part of any game. Being able to plan as you go along via a retcon mechanic seems like it would solve that, but wouldn't that involve changing the past based on your present? Like, as you're going along, you notice that something is set up to an alarm, so conveniently you had disabled that beforehand?
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Mon Mar 08, 2010 5:56 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: Players as audience or storyteller
Replies: 11
Views: 5409

One thing to take into consideration is that players, as identified by the people who have distinct player characters, are often going to be biased toward their own characters. The game-master, who does not have ownership of any single character, is free to be neutral.
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Sun Mar 07, 2010 9:15 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: Players as audience or storyteller
Replies: 11
Views: 5409

I usually just present some plot hook by a small contrived coincidence, and then let them follow it if they want. If they choose to go do something else, then that's fine, but the plot isn't going to wait around for them; if the world ends while they're off on some personal journey, then maybe they'll know better in the next life.

If the world doesn't end, then you've just added some aspect of other things going on in the world that doesn't revolve around the PCs, increasing verisimilitude.

Of course, the downside is that you can never plan more than ten minutes in advance, but everything is a trade-off.
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Fri Feb 26, 2010 1:20 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: player point economies
Replies: 17
Views: 7027

I don't generally play the kinds of games that use those kinds of rules, but my limited experience covers two instances:

In D&D 4E, every player character starts each day with exactly one point and gains another point after every other encounter. It's kind of a major game mechanic, but it just screams BALANCED.

I was in a D&D 3.5 game where the players had free access to a pool containing one each of every die from d4 to d12. One or more dice could be added to any die roll, but using it would cause it to go to the GM's pool until such time as he used it by an NPC against the party.
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Fri Jan 29, 2010 5:57 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: The End of the Stars Wars Saga (Edition)
Replies: 39
Views: 15791

I never played Star Wars, but I did play D&D 3.5, and I cheered when they cancelled it. I was tired of buying new books, and I'm happy that I can just sit down and play without having to worry about new supplements coming out and introducing new rules all the time. I'm sure that there are other people who feel that way about this Star Wars game.
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Tue Jan 26, 2010 11:33 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: Wisconsin inmate loses Dungeons and Dragons fight
Replies: 6
Views: 3769

To associate D&D with gang like behavior is... silly. On the other hand, why should criminals get to have as much fun as good law-abiding citizens?
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Fri Jan 22, 2010 2:39 am
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: damage rolls
Replies: 9
Views: 4922

I must admit that I'm not familiar with any systems that completely lack hit points. Even Shadowrun has ten hit points with an opposed defense roll to determine damage.

What really bothers me isn't the hit point mechanic per se, but only when it's treated as a completely abstract mechanic to measure the precise point of Critical Existence Failure (like D&D). Of course, using subsystem damage where each limb has its own hit points and different amounts of damage cause different effects (GURPS) is overly cumbersome and annoying to implement. I like the idea of these fun effects coming along with critical hits, and the (D&D) game I'm in now uses a critical hit deck to determine random effects without needing to look at a chart.

In-combat healing also bothers me, because the idea of closing significant wounds in real time as you are being hacked at with a large sword crosses the line from cool to silly. It's not impossible to alter D&D to fix that, though.

Honestly, I don't even know how a system without hit points would even work. Without hit points, you go from fine to dead instantly. I suppose if the system was really not designed for combat, then you could resolve it with a single die roll, but at that point I might argue that it becomes pure role-playing and the game aspect of it is gone.
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Thu Jan 21, 2010 5:17 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: damage rolls
Replies: 9
Views: 4922

My familiarity with Savage Worlds is passing at best, but from what I recall it tends toward a more dramatic (or even cinematic) flavor. In this case, damage rolls help achieve that flavor by letting your attacks possibly succeed when they should not.

I've been thinking about this sort of thing a lot lately, while designing my system, and there four ways to resolve combat that I know of:
  1. An attack roll against a static value, with damage determined by the margin of success. This has the benefit that it's fast, but it's not very dramatic: if you almost miss, then you cause minimal damage which is almost as good as missing. In an even match, this will make combat drag on for a long time, as both side repeatedly scratches the other. In an unbalanced fight, the stronger side will win quickly.
  2. An attack roll against a static value, with a separate damage roll. This has the benefit that you can possibly overcome adversity with enough luck: even if your opponent severely outmatches you, you have a (small) chance of hitting and a (small) chance of doing significant damage. It's also pretty fast, over all, because all attacks deal more than minimal damage. This is more likely to turn into a war of attrition, as our heroes are worn down slowly over the course of many encounters.
  3. An attack roll and a defense roll, with damage determined by the margin of success. This has the benefit that the players feel like they have more control over their fate, because no matter what's coming at you, you always get a chance to defend yourself. It also slows things down a lot because you have two rolls per turn and you have a lot of them because it takes a lot of hits to down an opponent (assuming an equally matched fight).
  4. An attack roll and a defense roll, with damage determined by a damage roll. This has the benefit that it feels fair, as above, but gets combat over with in a relatively quick manner. It does involve a back and forth between two parties alternating three dice rolls, so it feels like it takes longer.
I think a lot of it depends on the player. Most people I know, which includes nobody from these forums, like rolling dice. If I'm designing a game for people I know, then I'm more likely to include more dice rolling, because it's more fun for them.

If you just want to get things over with quickly, then you can have a single attack roll against a static target value with a static damage associated with it. I've never seen a game system use that method before, but it would theoretically get things over with most quickly (especially against mooks, who would otherwise take up a disproportionate amount of time to resolve).
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Wed Dec 16, 2009 1:30 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: Guess that RPG!
Replies: 103
Views: 37400


[quote="cczernia"]Correct, and for the record it is 2020 :mrgreen:[/quote]

I thought it might have been Cyberpunk, based on the similarities to Shadowrun, but I figured both were far too mainstream to be posted in this thread.



I wish I had a scanner.

by Dragonmaster Zoc
Wed Dec 09, 2009 5:09 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: D&D4 : alternate healing surge uses
Replies: 12
Views: 6097

You could just let everyone use them as a minor action, without restricting it to once per combat (maybe once per round). It basically turns them into extra hit points, but it should be easy to implement.
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Wed Dec 09, 2009 12:42 am
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: RPG Expectations
Replies: 62
Views: 27751

He could have intended the moons to be the tiny little distant rocks rather than anything like our moon, but I think he just made them do that because it would be cooler (by whatever measure he was using at the time). Likewise, I think warforged exist just because it made the setting more interesting and provides plothooks, without nearly enough consideration put into how thousand-pound metal/wood construct types would interact with assumptions made about player characters by the d20 system.

It's just my opinion.

Your mileage may vary. Eberron isn't for me (and neither is Dark Sun, for that matter), but I'm glad that someone can enjoy them. I think anything that far toward the gritty end on the sliding scale of idealism vs. cynicism is reither unrealistic or un-enjoyable, or both.

Again, just my opinion.
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Mon Dec 07, 2009 3:24 am
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: RPG Expectations
Replies: 62
Views: 27751

The key word is "likely"; even your standard prince or wizard is unlikely to be a hero. The odds are like four to one against.

A peasant is a whole different degree of unlikely. We're talking a million to one chance.

Now which one strains disbelief? Which one, to contrast, is more believable?

Where one draws the line between high and low fantasy is a matter of continuing debate and personal taste. I usually see it based on the degree to which the fantastic elements alter the setting away from a mundane one (i.e. how common is magic and how much does it matter), but regardless of the level of fantasy it will be the rich idiot with no day job who will come to the rescue because the dirt farmers are all busy farming dirt.

Warhammer does fit a different definition of low fantasy, though: some say the level of fantasy is based on the scale of the problem. LotR is high fantasy despite the incredible lack of actual magic because their quest determines the fate of the world, while Warhammer deals with the local problems of your home town sewers. These terms are very imprecise.

I don't mean to say anything bad about Warhammer, but it doesn't meet the expectations I have in a game system. I'm sure there are plenty of people who enjoy that kind of thing, and I don't want them to stop having fun on my account, but it's really just not my thing.
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Mon Dec 07, 2009 1:02 am
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: RPG Expectations
Replies: 62
Views: 27751

[quote="Uber_snotling"]Warhammer does a much better job than most fantasy systems in promoting the character as person goal you have listed here. It is a lot more believable for the typical medieval peasant to be employed as a rat catcher, camp follower, or town watchman than to be a fighter, range...
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Wed Dec 02, 2009 1:31 pm
Forum: Debate
Topic: devlin1 thinks jimmy corrigan is a hell of a guy
Replies: 10
Views: 7208

I cannot vote, because there is not a "No, not in the slightest" option.
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Tue Nov 24, 2009 6:21 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: RPG Expectations
Replies: 62
Views: 27751

I never meant to imply that I want a rule system that actively promotes roleplaying with game mechanics. I just meant that some systems have rules that actively discourage you from doing so. D&D is a big offender here, with things like the Gather Information skill (in 3E) that is explicitly supposed to take the place of role-playing so you skip right to the action, and spontaneous backstory re-arrangement in 4E (despite the fact that I was speaking Elven just twenty minutes ago, I actually only speak Common and Dwarven now). The former is an example of a rule that circumvents role-playing, while the second is an example of a rule that prevents someone from believing in these characters as anything more than game pieces. AD&D was better in this regard.

As for settings that take themselves seriously, did you know that Eberron has 12 moons with shifting orbits that brings a different moon closest each month? Pretty much any setting that describes itself as "pulp" is going to be relying on rule of cool instead of logic or reason.

Forgotten Realms is just a ridiculously high fantasy setting that fails to take into account what that means. I'll grant that it wants to take itself seriously, but that's really hard when there are so many powerful wizards around, so it's almost impossible for anyone else to take it seriously.
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Mon Nov 23, 2009 6:40 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: RPG Expectations
Replies: 62
Views: 27751

I expect players to treat their characters as people, rather than as game pieces. I expect everyone to promote the suspension of disbelief by not exploiting poorly written rules. Some systems are not written with the intention of facilitating one or both of these expectations, and I like to avoid those systems.

That's mostly what I mean by "traditional" fantasy, as contrasted with Warhammer, Eberron, or Forgotten Realms. I want something that at least tries to take itself seriously.
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Mon Nov 23, 2009 2:36 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: RPG Expectations
Replies: 62
Views: 27751

What's True20?
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Sat Nov 21, 2009 3:11 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: RPG Expectations
Replies: 62
Views: 27751

Regardless of tone, which is infamously difficult to determine online, I think it's safe to say that the moral of the story is, "It's important to ask what everyone expects from a game, because tastes vary between people and over time."
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Fri Nov 20, 2009 5:37 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: RPG Expectations
Replies: 62
Views: 27751

[quote="Uber_snotling"]Have you ever tried Warhammer? Magic retains its wonder (and can kill/mutate its users), PCs are definitely not special (e.g., the iconic ratcatcher career), and death/corruption/insanity are constant threats. [/quote] I honestly cannot say that I've ever even seen a book for...
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Fri Nov 20, 2009 2:19 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: RPG Expectations
Replies: 62
Views: 27751

[quote="jimmy corrigan"]although noble, doesn't your sentiment preclude any objective honesty if you're prepared to accept that your gm is lying to you? put in another way, if you expect your gm to lie to avoid a tpk, aren't you by your very acceptance of that fact make you partially culpable in th...
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Fri Nov 20, 2009 4:02 am
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: RPG Expectations
Replies: 62
Views: 27751

[quote="BlanchPrez"]Have you looked at Savage Worlds? I think that game could give you want you're looking for. :mr: Chris[/quote] I've looked it over two or three times, and I always get stuck at the same part. One of the major reasons I prefer D&D 3E to other editions is the internal consiste...
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Thu Nov 19, 2009 6:16 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: RPG Expectations
Replies: 62
Views: 27751

[quote="Count Zero"]D&D 4th Ed is much more the child of World of Warcraft than it is the child of Tolkien like previous editions are. That is throwing veteran players. Honestly, we aren't the target market for D&D, 16 year olds who have been raiding Onyxia's Lair are the target market.[/qu...
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Thu Nov 19, 2009 3:07 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: RPG Expectations
Replies: 62
Views: 27751

[quote="Count Zero"]You are absolutely correct on all these points. D&D4E was designed to do exactly what you describe. That is the heart of D&D essentially. Good games are designed to do specific kinds of things. The reason it is a good game design is because the rules themselves bring out...
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Fri Nov 13, 2009 1:00 am
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: RPG Expectations
Replies: 62
Views: 27751

[quote="Count Zero"] Basically, the designers of 4th edition did a great job in boiling D&D down into its base. It isn't a game designed to for doing games about noble intrigue or mass battles. Its sole purpose is to do epic heroes fighting horrifying monsters in cinematic, brutal combat. I thi...
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Thu Nov 12, 2009 9:05 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: RPG Expectations
Replies: 62
Views: 27751

[quote="Count Zero"]D&D has actually always been that. It has just never been so explicitly stated as it is now. Honestly though, most stories in D&D were simply justification to start a new combat. The problem was that players and GM's tried to fit a square peg into a round hole. [/quote] ...
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Thu Nov 12, 2009 6:39 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: RPG Expectations
Replies: 62
Views: 27751

Alignment of expectations is probably the single most important factor in whether a game goes well or not. How can a player and GM ever both have fun if their ideas of fun are in opposite directions?

The same goes between two players, and I've noticed most games tend to have one player who is only in it for the combat. When the GM tries to walk a balancing act between two extremes, only one side will ever be having fun at a time. When everyone has the same expectations, then a good GM can make everyone have fun at the same time (and if the GM is having problems, then they become obvious to everyone, because nobody is having fun).

I think part of the backlash against D&D 4E is that it seems to make a certain type of expectation into a precondition for playing the game: you will be a group of heroes who go into dark dungeons and use improbable fighting techniques to slay evil monsters of steadily increasing difficulty while accumulating a great wealth of magical items which allow you to ultimately save the world and achieve immortality. It's not terrible, as far as expectations go, but it is incredibly limiting. It's good for new players because it gets everyone onto the same page right away. It's bad for any experienced player who wants to do anything else.
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Tue Oct 27, 2009 12:51 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: What is your opinion of Little Fears?
Replies: 2
Views: 2381

I think it is enough of a niche setting that you could probably get some people to play it once every now and then, maybe for a Con or similar, but not as an ongoing type of thing.

I have no personal experience with the system.
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Fri Oct 16, 2009 3:24 am
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: Tips for Noobs
Replies: 11
Views: 5302

[quote="cczernia"] Third tip: Always try and flank your opponent, you get a +2 to hit [/quote] "Always" is a bit harsh. I would say, "flank when doing so does not hinder you." Everyone has had a character die from that unexpected critical hit when you provoke an attack of opportunity while trying t...
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Tue Oct 06, 2009 3:50 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: D&d4 Dmg2
Replies: 10
Views: 4887

[quote="BlanchPrez"]Why would that be? Not everyone who plays RPG's has the internet, or if they do, they don't all get on fourms like this one.[/quote] Even if they don't have the internet, they still have friends who share their interests and can hold an intelligent conversation (I hope). Maybe I...
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Thu Sep 24, 2009 10:37 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: D&d4 Dmg2
Replies: 10
Views: 4887

I thought that's what these forums were for.
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Thu Sep 24, 2009 6:10 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: D&d4 Dmg2
Replies: 10
Views: 4887

It's nice that they suggest these options, but is it really enough to carry an entire book? It is practical advice, but is it content?

It seems to me that this might be good for a new DM who maybe has never been exposed to these ideas, but are those the kind of people who are willing to invest into another book to tell them how to play?
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Mon Sep 21, 2009 3:27 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay 3E
Replies: 21
Views: 6908

Can we use regular dice to substitute for the specialty dice? Unless they are a completely unique shape with odd numbers of faces, you should be able to just map it over and people will learn how to translate the dice pretty quickly.

I'm really not a huge fan of meta- anything, and it sounds like I would probably not like this system very much. I am a fan of more simulationist fare, with acceptable breaks from reality being only those things that make the game easier to play.

Of course, any game is worth trying once. I'm not going to buy the books unless I know they'll get use, though.
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Fri Sep 18, 2009 5:12 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay 3E
Replies: 21
Views: 6908

This is the first I've heard about it, so obviously I'd need to learn more before I can have an opinion. I am always cautious about new dice mechanics, since it's difficult to tell whether it's actually better or just "different"; has anyone seen a preview of how they work?
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Mon Aug 24, 2009 5:16 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: Players who are taken out
Replies: 6
Views: 2911

Death is an inherent risk in adventuring, almost by definition. If there is no significant risk, then there's no sense of drama. If a character dies, then it's usually because the player was doing something dumb; suck it up, learn from the experience, and try to not be so reckless in the future.

Yes, not having fun because your character is dead is s a problem, but it's also a real incentive to care about your character.

Temporary loss of control, like that shaken issue, is disproportionately annoying relative to how little impact it has in the long run. Feel free to just ignore those rules, if you want to; ignore the option of surprise in combat, ban all mind-control abilities, etc. No system is a perfect representation, so feel free to sacrifice realism for playability to whatever degree you feel comfortable.


TLDR version: If you don't like losing control of your characters, then don't use the rules that result in such.
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Sat Jul 18, 2009 2:52 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: Trying to settle on a system for superheroes...help?
Replies: 19
Views: 5344

Have you considered writing your own system? I don't know if you have a lot of free time to think, but I've had some fairly mindless jobs in the past, and creating a system from scratch is a good way to not get bored. The hardest part is writing it all down.
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Tue Jun 30, 2009 7:33 am
Forum: Debate
Topic: Being PC
Replies: 10
Views: 6659

Political correctness is about asking for some base level of respect by first offering some small amount in exchange. Why should I bother to listen to someone who can't even be bothered to try to not offend me? It's not even about being up-to-date with your terminology; this is an area where intent is much more important than action.
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Thu Jun 25, 2009 11:40 pm
Forum: Gamers Wanted
Topic: Game Wanted - Storyteller/WoD
Replies: 6
Views: 4438

Someone's also starting a nWoD game in Lemon grove, at a different meetup group: http://www.meetup.com/sd-dnd/messages/b ... ad/7159782
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Thu Jun 25, 2009 9:48 pm
Forum: RPG Discussion
Topic: Favorite games by theme or category
Replies: 30
Views: 7635

High Fantasy: D&D 3E, GURPS
Low Fantasy: AD&D 2E, GURPS
Sci Fi: GURPS
Sci Fi Fantasy: Shadowrun, GURPS
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Wed Jun 24, 2009 10:27 pm
Forum: Gamers Wanted
Topic: Game Wanted - Storyteller/WoD
Replies: 6
Views: 4438

Here's a link to the meetup page: http://www.meetup.com/The-San-Diego-Sha ... tup-Group/

There's only been one meetup so far, and there's a group trying to form out of Escondido if you check the Message Board. It's a pretty small meetup over all, though.
by Dragonmaster Zoc
Wed Jun 24, 2009 6:22 pm
Forum: Gamers Wanted
Topic: Game Wanted - Storyteller/WoD
Replies: 6
Views: 4438

There's a Shadowrun meetup group operating out of Escondido, and that game (system, setting) has a lot in common with (especially the new) World of Darkness. Just thought I'd throw that out there.